Specialists in Stable Isotope & Metabolite Synthesis

ISO 9001

Metabolomics

Structure9125 Estrone-234-13C3As disease and health analyses progress, the desire to monitor and analyse simpler chemical and biochemical structures has also increased. Studies have moved from the human genome to the transcriptome to the proteome until more recently the focus has been squarely on the metabolome. The human metabolome is studied with an eye to studying the small chemical fingerprints that are left behind from cellular and related processes. As such the types of molecules usually studied are sugars, lipids, amino acids, peptides and other small molecules. These biochemistries are reviewed and are effectively utilized as biomarkers that can help determine a specific disease or potential disease state that could exist within a cell and patient.

Given the very low metabolome chemical concentration, analysis techniques have to be very sensitive in order to confidentally monitor the metabolome. Advances in mass spectrometry coupled with the availability of stable isotope labelled derivatives at IsoSciences allows the detailed analysis necessary in order to create reliable metabolomic and biomarker methodologies for the potential diagnosis of relevant disease states.

IsoSciences' synthesis team has created a broad catalog of readily available metabolomic relevant molecules including hormones, steroids, bile acids, amino acids and other relevant small molecules. All available molecules can be ordered online. However, if you need a specific metabolomic molecule that is not present in our catalog, please feel free to contact us by email or phone in order to discuss how we can assist with a custom synthesis to supply your needs. IsoSciences has a very high success rate with custom synthetic needs and our chemists have frequently been critical in generating the best possible standards for new customer application needs.

All metabolomic chemistries currently synthesized by IsoSciences catalog can be found here.

 

Metabolomics | Metabolomic